March 2013 ... New Orleans & Louisiana plantation houses. 
Photos from a romantic weekend with Lorraine, for now kept under a password.

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The trees in Oak Alle, Louisana, are about 300 years old, more than a 100 years older than the Oak Alley Plantation House that sits at the end of the alley. Click for an even larger image.
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... but we started the trip, of course, with a dinner on Bourbon Street, in New Orleans.  Click for an even larger image.
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... after dinner, beignets and coffee in Cafe Mundo ...
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... you get covered with sugar falling off the sticky beignets. 
It's not Paris, it's pure New Orleans.
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TBefore that, we stopped at Lorraine's mother's house. She has lovely azaleas in bloom. 
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Delivered some Guatemala coffee and today's Prensa Libre to Estela ... they call her Shelo.  Watched Ricardo Arjona's "Fuiste Tu?" together. It has so far been seen 85 million times ... the best ad for Guatemala!  You can click here and watch it, too. 
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We went around the beautiful Oak Alley antebellum plantation house.
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The oaks, although already 300 years old, are expected to live to 600, so a few more people can visit and enjoy one of the most beautiful places in the United States.
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Oak Alley, in Vacherie, Louisiana.  Beautiful.  The plantation house is seen behind us, at the end of the alley of oak trees.  Click for an even larger image.
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And we took a photo of Oak Alley with our lovely guide Cristen.  Click for an even larger image.
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Nottoway plantation.  Lorraine in the mirror.
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Nottoway plantation, upriver from Oak Alley, is the largest of all of them.  We stayed there, had a private tour at night, dinner, breakfast and a tour the next day. 
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We had a long walk on the Mississippi levee. In the morning, it was chilly, but warmed up by lunchtime, when we took the tour of the house.
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Again, we took a photo with our guide.  Behind us is the levee and the Mississippi.  Originally, the plantation went as far as the trees way in the distance, before the levee was constructed in the 1940's.  Click for an even larger image.
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One more photo from Oak Alley ...
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... and dinner on Bourbon Street, New Orleans. 

One day, some of these photos will appear on Facebook. 
One day soon. 
We had a great time and there is more of Louisiana still to see.
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This page was last updated on 03/27/13.